HighJam #1 – Berzerkatron

UPDATE: The results of HighJam #1 are online. Berzerkatron got Second Place in Theme and Third Place in Graphics! Thank you to all those who have provided feedback. I have since updated a post-jam version of the game and to celebrate the results a new update has been uploaded. You can find out more on Itch.io.

As part of my effort to participate in one game jam a month, the month of February is HighJam. This is the first game jam is organised by HighSight Gaming, a Twitch Streamer who specialised in Indie Games with Indie Insights for a while (a show which Gemstone Keeper appeared twice on), although now it’s been replaced with a new show analysing classic games, In Hindsight.

The theme of this jam was Atari Remakes, specifically to quote the description: “you must reimagine any Atari 2600 game of your choice”. One of my favourite 2600 games made by Atari was Berzerk, originally released at arcades in 1980 and was ported to 2600 in 1982. While the rules stated that I was not limited to the graphics, sounds and mechanics of the original, I felt like doing a “modernized” look wouldn’t do so well. The concept in my mind was to do a reimagining that would be in the style of Jeff Minter. It’s most likely due to the man’s past work, I had an image in my head of a “Berzerk 2000” of sorts, with a psychedelic feel, visually creative backgrounds and random sound samples.

Click here to go straight to the game!


Here is how I developed two of the most interesting concepts of this game:

The Level Rotating Transitions

This was a feature I was really keen to make, and once I found it was possible and implement, I wanted to keep silent about it so people can witness it while playing and see what their first reaction to it was, and when watching HighSight’s Playthrough (Skip to 01:54:30) I think it’s safe to say it worked. The initial version of the cube shader was by gre on gl-transitions.com, a website I’ve used recently for Gemstone Keeper.

The shader itself fakes perspective by skewing both textures so it appears thinner when further away, and moves both so it appears like a cube.

I modified the texture to remove the reflection at the bottom as it seemed unecessary and added a variable and functions so it could not only rotate it clockwise in the Y-Axis for horizontal transitions, but rotate it in the X-Axis for vertical transitions, it was then a case of using a uniform variable for me to define which direction I want the shader to rotate towards. You can check out the modified shader in the Assets folder of the game.

Randomized Levels

Funnily enough, having the levels be randomized wasn’t out to be creative but because I couldn’t think of a quick method of creating a huge array of level designs (the original Berzerk had somewhere in the range of 1024 different level variations!).

When looking through the original Atari version, I figured the levels were all configured into a 3×3 grid (I realised I was incorrect afterwards, as the Atari 2600 had 4×3 grid levels and the Arcade version had 5×3 levels), and then by defining each segment to a binary number I could determine which segment should have walls in either or all four directions.

I’d then construct a path between the player’s starting segment and the segments of each available exit, for the the remaining segments that have no value set, I’d use a random value. This last step had to be constrained as to have as few empty rooms as possible. However, as the above gif shows, not all levels are fully explorable. I also use the grid to determine which areas enemies and civilians should appear in.

Backgrounds

Unfortunately, I didn’t have the time to plan out or work on the brilliant background effects Jeff Minter develops, but GLSL-Sandbox is an excellent gallery of GLSL shaders that render brilliant visuals without any additional assets. I decided to pick ones that were monochromatic and were visually interesting without pointing too much attention from the game itself. I also used my multipass shader system to apply a shader that added a diamond gradient and another that made it possible to crossfade between different backgrounds.

Civilians

Interestingly, the idea of civilians to rescue (idea taken from Robotron and Llamatron) was kind of a last minute idea. I added this part of the game to encourage players to explore the level and add pressure to spend more time in the level while involving Evil Otto.

I did run out of time to implement some things I wanted like particle effects, but I’m happy I managed to get a playable version done. I did take one or two days off to have some leisure (and charity work) but I feel this is worthwhile. Hopefully enough people will vote and leave a good rating on this game.

New Years Resolutions

Good evening everyone! It’s no doubt that 2017 has been a hell of a year following what happened in 2016, but we fought through and we are still here fighting! This year has also been huge in terms of game development for me. I managed to finish SEVEN games this year, six from game jams such as #RemakeJam, PROCJam, Jamchester and Three Ludum Dares!

https://img.itch.zone/aW1hZ2UvMTYzMjc3Lzc1MjE2Ni5naWY=/315x250%23c/L0i8g2.gif  https://img.itch.zone/aW1hZ2UvMjAxMDM1LzkzOTE3OC5naWY=/315x250%23c/q5QpUK.gif

The seventh game was the nearly two year project Gemstone Keeper, which made an initial release on March 31st earlier this year and has since had numerous updates, although grouped together as four updates. The most recent of which was 1.0.4 that was announced on 21st of December. The game is currently on part of the Steam Winter Sale, and is currently 50% off!

Gemstone Keeper also had a second smaller release as it was ported to Linux, the build being available on Steam in June. I documented the progress to port the game in three blog posts (part 1, part 2 and part 3), and got a small amount of coverage from dedicated linux gaming websites as a result.

There was also an accomplishment in travel as well, 2017 was the year I went to both GDC in San Francisco and Develop in Brighton for the first time! Both events were great opportunities to meet up and socialise with fellow game developers and listen to talks from great minds such as Ken Perlin, John and Brenda Romero, Jordan Mechnar and Tim Sweeny.

As for 2018, I want to set some goals. As with many New Years Resolutions, chances are they will be forgotten and unaccomplished, but considering I managed to lose weight this year, I might pull through with a bit of committment.

First one is that I want to take part in at least one game jam a month, meaning I’d be finishing 12 games next year. I like the challenge and creativity from game jams, but this year I feel like six isn’t enough. At least spacing out the game jams to one a month will give me time to find a weekend or so to get my head down and finish something.

Second one is to get a game on console. It’s not like I haven’t bothered trying before (I’ve reached out to Nintendo about developing Gemstone Keeper for the Switch to no avail), but it would be nice to expand my work beyond desktop PCs and web development. Porting my own game to Linux should show how when I put my mind to it, building a game to another platform by hand is possible, and it would be great to show I can do that on one of the three main systems.

Thanks for reading and have a happy new year everyone!

Gemstone Keeper on Steam Right Now

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Check out the Steam Store, and you’ll see that Gemstone Keeper has a page where you can add to your wishlist, purchase the game and write a review for it. I greatly appreciate seeing people buying the game and giving it a good review, it really means a lot after realising that this game has been in development for nearly two years (May 2015 – April 2017). Reviews in particular are important because I’d like to collect a list of issues and make fixes, and hopefully add a bit more to the game over the course of a year. Gemstone Keeper will also be shown at Insomnia 60 at the Birmingham NEC and maybe a few more events if people find an interest.

In particular I want to thank Vincent Rubinetti for his contributions for the game. While he was the person I had in mind to do the soundtrack from the point I listened to his music in INK, I was a bit nervous about approaching him with the demo I had. However after a few emails back and forth, we made an agreement and we were underway for producing a great accompanyment to the game’s visual art style and atmosphere.

https://i0.wp.com/i.imgur.com/ajrVcHB.gif  https://i1.wp.com/i.imgur.com/24gcQz8.gif

In addition, I’d like to apologise for leaving this two days late; I couldn’t plan ahead because I spent the last few days sending out emails and twitter DMs in the hopes to get the game looked at by people; I fixed bugs and adding some last minute features such as damage numbers appearing whenever you hit something with your bullets and being able to type the seed you want to use in Score Mode.

On the launch day, I was at Rezzed, where I did talk to a few people about my game, but mainly walked around and tried out a selection of great titles. By the time 6pm rolled around, I hung out at an after party and chatted to a few developers.

Then the day after was my birthday, so I figured I would post on social media, but spend most of the time away from the game and more with friends and family to celebrate and relax.

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As for my future plans, aside from this game’s maintenance, I’m hoping to return to smaller games for a while. In particular I want to try a few more game jams and experiment a bit more, I have a few ideas I want to try out, and now I have a little less pressure on me to work a bit on them.

Procedural Meshes: Generating Gemstones Part 1

So two years ago as a student researching for his thesis, I took part in the first procjam. Organised by Michael Cook, this is a games jam that focuses on procedural content, whether that be games, art, text, tools, anything that can make something. Last year I decided to go a bit basic, write some pre-existing noise and maze algorithms for the Haxe Programming Language, which I eventually tweaked and published on Haxelib and Github as MAN-Haxe.

Last year, I decided that for my current project, I was going to do something relevant, and this time use no pre-existing algorithms, this is where the Gemstone Generator comes in. I have images of the meshes below that show the progress from early successful generations to the final most generation test before the UI layout was cleaned up and the demo was uploaded. The generative process is now being used in Gemstone Keeper, albeit with a different rendering process considering I’m turning Unity’s Procedural Meshes into SFML meshes.

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#GBjam, Game Development and Work Updates

I’m back and ready to update everyone on what’s been happening since I went to Japan last month, which was an awesome holiday where I got to go to the cities of Tokyo, Kyoto, Osaka and Sendai, with highlights including seeing foxes at the Zao Fox Village, walk around Akihabara’s arcades, game and electronic stores, dressing up as a Samurai, going to the Ghibli Museum and Nintendo’s Old Headquarters! Despite being in very humid weather, and both my sister and I carrying our bags from hostel to guest house to hostel almost every night, we were able to see so much and yet miss out on quite a lot. We talked with other travellers and heard about seeing Mt Fuji and Sumo Wrestling in Nagano among others, but I think I can see them another time.

But only a few weeks after I got back, I was out again for a week in Ireland…which is why the longer than normal absence. I got to see some of the big towns and cities from Cork to Dublin, as well as a lot of countryside, however it did help bring inspiration for a game I recently made.
Welcome to Kilkenny Pub Brawl!

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Glow Drop DX and Global Games Jam are Out!

Over the last week, I’ve technically had to prepare for two releases, and guess what? Both games are out, and I’ve updated the game menu to include links to them! It’s pretty cool how both games were originally made at 48 hour game jams, and both are being updated as we speak. Feel free to read on about my experiences with Global Games Jam this year, and try out these two releases as soon as possible, all feedback is awesome!

Glow Drop DX

We Are Surrounded

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Secret of Escape Shortlisted for TIGA Games Industry Awards 2014

I’m proud to announce that Secret of Escape has been shortlisted for Best Student Game and Game of the Year at this years TIGA Games Industry Awards. The ceremony will celebrate a year of game releases from the UK Games Industry from all developers of all sizes, from indies to the AAA.

This is definitely a huge honour to see a well known organisation in the Games Industry as TIGA to recognise the hard work of those, including individuals and students. I’ve worked very hard during my placement year to bring Secret of Escape to the masses, seeing people praise the game and now for it to be shortlisted for a major award definitely makes the extra effort worthwhile.

If you haven’t already, you can now download Secret of Escape, the fast-paced stealth action game, from Desura, Itch.io and IndieGameStand.

Readers and members of the public can vote for Secret of Escape for Game of the Year here, voting opens until 20th October.