Ludum Dare 42 – Closing in on Pascal

The game jam for August was Ludum Dare 42, so with it coming to a close, I thought it’d be good to talk about how the submission [Closing in on Pascal](https://ldjam.com/events/ludum-dare/42/closing-in-on-pascal) came about and what I learned from it.

Ludum Dare 42 was particularly exciting for me, as it was the first LD in a long time that I had a completely free weekend. As such, I decided to plan the first day entirely for gameplay, with graphics and audio on the second day. That way I get a solid game and then plenty of time to work on making it look and sound nice, you’ll find out why that plan isn’t flawless as it sounds.

When it came to the theme, I was already very pessimistic that it would be a theme I’d be happy with, it’s been a common trend for people to vote on the theme that no one wants. I even voted against the theme “Running Out of Space” but when it turns out to be the chosen one, I thought it was pretty good.

The concept of running out of space I had was inspired by the cartoon trap of the walls closing in on someone in a temple. I figured a game where the player has to reach an exit before the room crushes them to death.

Fortunately, I have a bit of experience with platformers in my game engine from a previous jam, so the tilemap, jump physics and mechanics such as wall jumping I have previously implemented.

LD42-00000.gif

The jump animations itself was done because I remembered the indie platformer INK having good squash & stretch. To achieve it I modify the scale so that it squashes inwards when going up and stretches outward. If I had more abilities to adjust the individual vertices I could do more fun aspects of moving like skewing.

LD42-00001.gif

Since my idea was inspired by a temple film/TV trope, I already had the visual theme in my mind. I also thought it would be good if I had a little cartoon character who’d look like Indiana Jones. It was fun working with pixel art and animation once again, but if I was to do this again I would have done a much simpler approach. The player character is way too small for the game screen, meaning that its animations are pretty much useless. I also had a bit of issue with making the colours stand out so it doesn’t feel all yellow and brown.

LD42-00002.gif

In the end, it took around 3 – 4 hours to work on the background environments and 5 hours to work on the player sprite and all the obstacles. If I went with a much simpler design or scrapped the temple theming and used the simple colours and shapes it would have been much clearer and easier to look at.

LD42-00009.gif

The sound and music was achieved with LMMS and BFXR. I like making NES-like chiptune in there but I do notice it’s restrictive in areas like tones and tempo, so I couldn’t get the sounds I want. It also didn’t help that thanks to the graphics, I had much less time to work on sound and music so it ended up rushed.

The post-jam has most of what I would have added or done better if I had time. Particle effects, using directional keys as well as the WASD buttons, and a better title logo. I would have also worked on more levels but seeing how many levels players are willing to go through, then maybe the existing levels should have been improved slightly.

I’m a little worried about what the rankings will be for this one, I’m definitely glad I could take part but I feel as though I wasted too much time on the graphics when a simpler approach would have been effective. You can go check out [Closing in on Pascal](https://ldjam.com/events/ludum-dare/42/closing-in-on-pascal).

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New Years Resolutions

Good evening everyone! It’s no doubt that 2017 has been a hell of a year following what happened in 2016, but we fought through and we are still here fighting! This year has also been huge in terms of game development for me. I managed to finish SEVEN games this year, six from game jams such as #RemakeJam, PROCJam, Jamchester and Three Ludum Dares!

https://img.itch.zone/aW1hZ2UvMTYzMjc3Lzc1MjE2Ni5naWY=/315x250%23c/L0i8g2.gif  https://img.itch.zone/aW1hZ2UvMjAxMDM1LzkzOTE3OC5naWY=/315x250%23c/q5QpUK.gif

The seventh game was the nearly two year project Gemstone Keeper, which made an initial release on March 31st earlier this year and has since had numerous updates, although grouped together as four updates. The most recent of which was 1.0.4 that was announced on 21st of December. The game is currently on part of the Steam Winter Sale, and is currently 50% off!

Gemstone Keeper also had a second smaller release as it was ported to Linux, the build being available on Steam in June. I documented the progress to port the game in three blog posts (part 1, part 2 and part 3), and got a small amount of coverage from dedicated linux gaming websites as a result.

There was also an accomplishment in travel as well, 2017 was the year I went to both GDC in San Francisco and Develop in Brighton for the first time! Both events were great opportunities to meet up and socialise with fellow game developers and listen to talks from great minds such as Ken Perlin, John and Brenda Romero, Jordan Mechnar and Tim Sweeny.

As for 2018, I want to set some goals. As with many New Years Resolutions, chances are they will be forgotten and unaccomplished, but considering I managed to lose weight this year, I might pull through with a bit of committment.

First one is that I want to take part in at least one game jam a month, meaning I’d be finishing 12 games next year. I like the challenge and creativity from game jams, but this year I feel like six isn’t enough. At least spacing out the game jams to one a month will give me time to find a weekend or so to get my head down and finish something.

Second one is to get a game on console. It’s not like I haven’t bothered trying before (I’ve reached out to Nintendo about developing Gemstone Keeper for the Switch to no avail), but it would be nice to expand my work beyond desktop PCs and web development. Porting my own game to Linux should show how when I put my mind to it, building a game to another platform by hand is possible, and it would be great to show I can do that on one of the three main systems.

Thanks for reading and have a happy new year everyone!

All the jams!

I was meaning to post this sooner, but along with work piling up and losing track, I did quite a few game jams. Three in particular: RemakeJam, Jamchester and Ludum Dare.

  

I’ll mention Running The Marathon first, because I only finished the game two days ago from posting. This was made for Ludum Dare 39, which makes it the 10th Ludum Dare I participated (and 9th I submitted a game independently). This was a bit of a last minute entry because until Saturday evening, I had no intention of making something for LD. What changed my mind was a game idea I was coming up with as a joke, running a marathon and making sure you don’t run out of energy. What I ended up with was a bit of a joke on the Track & Field concept, by having rapid button presses make your chances at success worse. Because of how little time I worked on this, the background animations and sounds are lacking, although I do think the running animation on the player turned out okay.

4i8mLl.gif

As is the tradition of Ludum Dare, voting will be going on by all participants for a total of three weeks. Any Ludum Dare entrants can go to the game’s Ludum Dare event page to vote and comment.

Next I’ll talk about Dash Dodge, which was developed for Jamchester 2017, a professional games jam that I took part in last year. This year, I was in a team which consisted of another programmer & sound designer (Jessica Winters) and two artists ( and ). All in all, this was a great team to work with, and we had a heavily planned out game about combatting bosses using only dashing, with a time travel element, although we may have over-anticipated our goals a bit. Needless to say, we made a game with a nice visual style and some neat mechanics thrown around. Hopefully at some point in the future I would like to work with these three again at some point.

Finally, there is 8-Bit Theater: Black Mage is in a Shooting Game. This game, developed for RemakeJam, is a remake of a previous game of mine. In particular, this is a remake of the first game I ever made from back in 2010. What was great about working on this is that I still have the original source project and most of the original assets and notes, although I did have to dig through Google for a copy of GameMaker 8.1 in order to view the original project. Sadly because of lack of time (I rarely allow full days of focus for these game jams, I’ve noticed), I just about managed to remake the original two levels and boss. This wasn’t for naught though, as way back when it took me over a year to reach this far, and this time I managed to achieve the same amount in less than a week. I also took advantage of my own game framework to try out some technical challenges, such as parallax scrolling.

Game Jams are fun, I like taking part in them for those short bursts of game ideas and development challenges. Sadly participating is made more difficult when my day-job takes priority, but when I get a chance to take part I’d like to take full reigns!

Now time for some voting and other challenges!

Ludum Dare 38 – littleBLASTplanet

Last weekend was Ludum Dare 38, not only is it the 38th main game, as well as the 8th or 10th one I’ve taken part in (whether or not you take into account failed attempts), but it also marks the 15 Year Anniversary of the competition/jam as a whole! Not only is it celebrated with another jam, but with a brand new website. For now you can still access the old website, but game submissions are currently being handled entirely on the new site.

ldjamalpha

The theme this time around was Small World, so I (like a lot of devs) made a game either around a small game world or a tiny planet. I went with the latter and drew up a run ‘n gun shooter on a little planet.

 

Sadly I had plans with my friends on Saturday so I didn’t start work on the game until around 8PM GMT, so development felt more rushed than a full games jam but I managed to make what I set out to design: littlePLANETblast

Similar to my past Ludum Dare projects, I used HaxeFlixel. It’s straightforward to use, multiplatform (Flash, HTML, Windows and Android maybe…) and it’s still being maintained so there have been several improvements. I’ve provided the game’s source code on Github so feel free to have a look to see how the game works.

The first problem I had to solve to make this game work is how to make a sprite orbit a planet. HaxeFlixel has a FlxVector object for vector math, so using that with a sprite’s acceleration meant having the sprite fall towards the centre of a circular planet was pretty easy, but how do you get the sprite to stop on the planet’s surface?

HaxeFlixel has no circular collision, only rectangtle collision. When I wrote my own C++ framework for Gemstone Keeper, which took inspirations from HaxeFlixel, I included Circular collision by giving each object a Radius property and writing my own circle overlap and separation functions. This would have been too much work for the time I had, so I wrote a hack method for a derived sprite class that always checked and updated the distance between a sprite’s centre and the planet’s centre, and if the distance was less than both the planet’s radius and sprite’s radius combined, then the game pushes the sprite up to the edge of the planet. This circle collision method is only applied between a sprite and the planet, and since rectangles don’t rotate then all sprites had to be perfect squares.

Bullets were one of the only sprites that weren’t built to orbit the planet, instead simply moving in an angle that combines the firing direction with the player’s current angle. I’ve had some feedback that said that the bullets should also be affected by gravity. I decided against it because it would make enemies on the planet easier to hit, while enemies in the sky would be harder to aim, not to mention the game loses a strategy element because of where bullets travel.

 

I went with three base enemy types: Rockets, Spikes and Robots.

Robots functions no differently from the player, except that it moves in a fix direction and smaller ones bounce by constantly jumping. Spikes has the same orbiting system, but it’s planet radius is much smaller to allow it to go into the planet. I use FlxTween and the FlxTimer to allow the spikes to move in sequence. Rockets simply spawn outside the screen at an angle and move towards the centre of the planet. If a rocket touches the planet then it would be destroyed, resulting in an instant game over.

I also added an escape object, which changes the planets side and makes the level a little bit more harder. This was for variety, so you wouldn’t have to stay on the same planet. If I had a bit more time I would have included more animations on the planet itself.

Speaking of the planet, that was one of the first objects I applied polished graphics to. To give it a more detailed pattern, I used the built in Cellular Automata function, and applied the pixels to the circle. Since it uses a random seed, the pattern is different on each playthrough.

The planet’s destruction is a particle effect that uses the planet sprite’s texture, a technique I used a lot in Gemstone Keeper. However one gripe was that I had to make a derived FlxEmitter class that could allow me to set how many frames I wanted based on the particle’s frame size.

Along with proper sprites, smoke was added to the spikes so that the game can provide a one second warning before spikes hit. I also added a distance check to avoid some unfair spike deaths. Finally I added a second camera mode incase the first one wasn’t interesting enough. The follow camera simply rotates with the player so they can stay in one spot while all the other objects rotated around. It did mean having to create a new Camera for UI elements, since objects can only be parallax scrolled by position.

The last elements I added were the title screen and audio. Sound effects were produced with BFXR and music with Abundent-Music’s Procedural Music Generator. Audio is one of my weakest skills so these procedural tools made that quick and simple, although I probably wouldn’t enter myself into the audio category for them.

I figured I add a smaller version of the planet in the title screen and have the player sprite on a bigger world to give a vague sense of a setting, with emphasis that the player is fighting on tiny planets and not just a giant on a regular sized planet.

And that’s basically how I made littleBLASTplanet. If I had more time I probably would have created more enemies and made proper transitions between planets. Aside from that I’m pretty happy with the results, particularly hacking the physics to getting jumping and moving around a 2D planet to be possible.

Voting for the game begins on Wednesday Friday, so if you took part in Ludum Dare, please check it out!

New Years Update

It has now been one full week of 2017, and a lot of people (including myself) have slowly gotten back to work. Since Gemstone Keeper has been getting close to release, I’ve started work as soon as we can to get stuff done.

Before I get into Gemstone Keeper, I worked on a little game for Ludum Dare 37 where the player is stuck in a porta-loo balancing in the air. That game was Danger: Mondays, and after two weeks of voting the results are in. The results for this Ludum Dare were definitely beyond my expectations. While the amount of submissions for the compo were smaller compared to past years (901 compared to 1117 at LD35), that doesn’t devalue the fact that Danger: Mondays achieved a rank just a few places shy of Top 25 in the Humour category of all categories.

capture

Reading all the comments, I was glad people found the concept amusing, but I’m completely grateful at the how well I did this time around. Thank you to everyone who voted during the day. Apologies for not posting about Ludum Dare any sooner, but I was working on a bigger game.

To be a bit more descriptive, Boss Rush will have the player beating all five bosses as fast as possible, they are able to set the stats and weapons of their explorer before hand and they regain some of their health after defeating each boss.

Score mode allows the player to go through the caverns, and like the daily run mode, will try and get the highest score possible by collecting as many gemstones and materials as they can on a single run. This time however, the player is free to set the seed they want, which will effect all aspects of the game from the levels, player stats, which weapon they have and which items they’ll have at the start.

One of the benefits of working on these game modes (from a developer’s perspective) is that we go through all the main game modes again to not only ensure they work through both the main game mode and these smaller game modes, but to find any bugs or issues that was missed out the first few times.

Another update we’ve done is on the gemstones themselves, namely how they are rendered. Originally, the Gemstone Geometry was generated using a Gemstone Mesh Generator that was developed at PROCJAM, and then rendered using a custom software approach using SFML (you can read a comprehensive write up of this on my websites in part 1 and part 2). However, over the last week of December, it was decided that it was time to update this for performance and to improve quality by changing the rendering process to an OpenGL Hardware render approach.

Below you can see the difference, on the left is the software approach, and the right is the new hardware approach:

This weekend I’ve been playing around with post-process effects, as it would be nice to have some visual effects that would appear through the entire game, although it would be possible for the player to disable certain effects if that want to. To pull this off, the framework now has a multipass post processing system where it’s possible to disable certain effects.

This allows us to apply multiple post process effects at once, and allows us to add the options we need to allow players to enable/disable certain ones.

CRT Shader

Bloom Shader

This is only a small sample of what is being planned, leading up to Gemstone Keeper’s release on March 31st 2017. I’ll also be attending London Gaming & Anime Con in early February and GDC in San Francisco later in the month, however the latter will just be as an attendee.

Here’s to 2017 being a successful year for many people!

Ludum Dare and Steam Greenlight

This last week of April is going to be a busy week, and May will be even busier, so I’d figure it’s best to write this out now. Last week I took part in Ludum Dare 35, with 48 hours on a surprisingly rare free-weekend (my weekends are usually filled by going out and hanging out with people or going to events, such is life). The theme was shapeshift, so obviously a lot of games involve changing shapes with a few that either use shapeshifting in either the levels, the monsters or even in the mechanics.

While the theme voting was going on, one of the suggested themes was “Two Colours”, and so all my ideas were pretty much blurred out by one of my favourite games of all time: Ikaruga. So I decided to combine shapeshifting ships with colour shifting bullet absorbing, this is where Spinstar comes from.

 

This was quite fun to make, particularly with the animation and the bullet patterns, you can go vote on the game here or play the game directly on itch.io here. I’ll be voting on games still, hopefully I’ll get a good score like my past entries.

On other pressing matters, I plan to take Gemstone Keeper to Steam Greenlight. I have already been working on the Steam page itself, but I’m giving myself three weeks to fine-tune the page, get the trailer finished and let as many people know about it as possible.

Steam Greenlight Anouncement

I’ve been working on the trailer, I’ve had difficulties getting game footage until recently, I might write about it once the Steam Greenlight page goes online but it all comes down to trying to find a method that outputs videos with the least washed out colours and as little blurring as possible.

I’ll also keep progress of the game where I can, I’ve been working on bosses and I want to get started on items.

 

Grow Trees… Or Something – Ludum Dare

So this is something I didn’t expect to happen, around two weeks ago was Ludum Dare, where we all had only 48 hours (or 72 for jams) to develop a game, however because I had plans to go to a party that was some distance from home, I had much less time. Despite that I still managed to finish something, although honestly was disappointed I didn’t have much to show, so I could go and vote on other entries.

You can play my entry for Ludum Dare 34 here, but here’s my post mortem as written on the Ludum Dare website.

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