Global Games Jam 2018

One of my New Years Resolutions is to take part in at least one games jam each month. This was a goal I set myself so I could develop more variety of games for the year of 2018. For myself, the games jam of January (and first games jam of the year) was Global Games Jam 2018, taking place on site at Staffordshire University in Stoke-on-Trent.

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I’ve regularly participated at GGJ since 2013 at the Stafford Campus, however in 2016 the Stafford Campus eventually closed its doors and all the departments (Computer Science, Game Development, Web Development, Film, TV and Music etc) were all moved to the Stoke Campus. I skipped 2017 after a lot of regular GGJ attendees were put off by travelling to Stoke and hearing that because of security issues they couldn’t allow overnight stay. Near the end of 2017, one of my friends asked if I was interested in going since she was going as well, so I thought “Sure, why not?”.

Stoke Campus has improved a lot since I went there on rare occasions as a Student, and GGJ became a lot more organised on that site. Gone were the days where getting a table or a PC being a free-for-all, as people had to get tickets in advance for what kind of room they want, and each room had plenty of machines with the latest software (especially for Unity and Unreal Engine 4 developers). Gone were the days of little to no security or support since all rooms required a badge to get into (all attendees received badges at the start of the day) and the jam had volunteers available to provide support for the entire 48 hours. Gone were the lack of food and drinks on site as free fruit, tea and coffee were available on site, and with both Subway and the University’s Student Union Bar open all weekend and a short walk from the site.

The games jam began with a keynote, featuring tips & tricks from Unity, an ad for the Amazon Appstore, a celebration of 10 years of GGJ, a talk from Robin Hunicke and an 80s style workout video from Thorsten S. Wiedemann. The audience was riffing the whole keynote up until the theme announcement, which was fun and all but I did feel bad for Robin’s talk as she was giving an inspiring talk that was meant to encourage interesting stories and concepts, but the six minutes of nonstop talking with an unchanging shot of the San Francisco Bay Area bored almost everyone.

The theme was Transmission, and the theme announcement segment implied this could be anything from communication, to mechanical to passing one thing to another. Our team consisted of myself, my friend Kira, programmer James and two 3D modellers, Benz and Matt. We came up with the idea of a twin-stick shooter where you move along sound waves. James did an incredible job of generating sound waves visually using vertex shaders and lining up the player position with the line, Kira created a tone generator for the game to use, and I worked on enemy behaviour, management, bullets, GUI and main menus, and we all chipped in where we could to get the game in a finished state. Benz and Matt worked on the in-game models, as well as a nebula skybox. Here is the progress in tweets:

So we managed to finish with about an hour or two to spare, which is very good for us. I hardly post much about what I’ve worked on at GGJ because in most of the events they end up not finished, but this is the third out of five GGJs that ended up being finished. So here’s our game: Formants

Let’s see what the games jam of February will be.

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New Years Resolutions

Good evening everyone! It’s no doubt that 2017 has been a hell of a year following what happened in 2016, but we fought through and we are still here fighting! This year has also been huge in terms of game development for me. I managed to finish SEVEN games this year, six from game jams such as #RemakeJam, PROCJam, Jamchester and Three Ludum Dares!

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The seventh game was the nearly two year project Gemstone Keeper, which made an initial release on March 31st earlier this year and has since had numerous updates, although grouped together as four updates. The most recent of which was 1.0.4 that was announced on 21st of December. The game is currently on part of the Steam Winter Sale, and is currently 50% off!

Gemstone Keeper also had a second smaller release as it was ported to Linux, the build being available on Steam in June. I documented the progress to port the game in three blog posts (part 1, part 2 and part 3), and got a small amount of coverage from dedicated linux gaming websites as a result.

There was also an accomplishment in travel as well, 2017 was the year I went to both GDC in San Francisco and Develop in Brighton for the first time! Both events were great opportunities to meet up and socialise with fellow game developers and listen to talks from great minds such as Ken Perlin, John and Brenda Romero, Jordan Mechnar and Tim Sweeny.

As for 2018, I want to set some goals. As with many New Years Resolutions, chances are they will be forgotten and unaccomplished, but considering I managed to lose weight this year, I might pull through with a bit of committment.

First one is that I want to take part in at least one game jam a month, meaning I’d be finishing 12 games next year. I like the challenge and creativity from game jams, but this year I feel like six isn’t enough. At least spacing out the game jams to one a month will give me time to find a weekend or so to get my head down and finish something.

Second one is to get a game on console. It’s not like I haven’t bothered trying before (I’ve reached out to Nintendo about developing Gemstone Keeper for the Switch to no avail), but it would be nice to expand my work beyond desktop PCs and web development. Porting my own game to Linux should show how when I put my mind to it, building a game to another platform by hand is possible, and it would be great to show I can do that on one of the three main systems.

Thanks for reading and have a happy new year everyone!

Gemstone Keeper – Quest to Linux Part 3 – Gemstone Keeper

Finally, after beginning soon after the game’s Windows release on Steam, and well over a month after I initially wrote my first post about this topic, I’m finally done with porting Gemstone Keeper to Linux (for the most part) and ready to write about what I’ve learned from porting it over. Since both the Framework and Level Generator have been ported, getting the whole game to compile and run wasn’t as confusing as the last two, but that didn’t stop it being tedious.

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Ludum Dare 38 – littleBLASTplanet

Last weekend was Ludum Dare 38, not only is it the 38th main game, as well as the 8th or 10th one I’ve taken part in (whether or not you take into account failed attempts), but it also marks the 15 Year Anniversary of the competition/jam as a whole! Not only is it celebrated with another jam, but with a brand new website. For now you can still access the old website, but game submissions are currently being handled entirely on the new site.

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The theme this time around was Small World, so I (like a lot of devs) made a game either around a small game world or a tiny planet. I went with the latter and drew up a run ‘n gun shooter on a little planet.

 

Sadly I had plans with my friends on Saturday so I didn’t start work on the game until around 8PM GMT, so development felt more rushed than a full games jam but I managed to make what I set out to design: littlePLANETblast

Similar to my past Ludum Dare projects, I used HaxeFlixel. It’s straightforward to use, multiplatform (Flash, HTML, Windows and Android maybe…) and it’s still being maintained so there have been several improvements. I’ve provided the game’s source code on Github so feel free to have a look to see how the game works.

The first problem I had to solve to make this game work is how to make a sprite orbit a planet. HaxeFlixel has a FlxVector object for vector math, so using that with a sprite’s acceleration meant having the sprite fall towards the centre of a circular planet was pretty easy, but how do you get the sprite to stop on the planet’s surface?

HaxeFlixel has no circular collision, only rectangtle collision. When I wrote my own C++ framework for Gemstone Keeper, which took inspirations from HaxeFlixel, I included Circular collision by giving each object a Radius property and writing my own circle overlap and separation functions. This would have been too much work for the time I had, so I wrote a hack method for a derived sprite class that always checked and updated the distance between a sprite’s centre and the planet’s centre, and if the distance was less than both the planet’s radius and sprite’s radius combined, then the game pushes the sprite up to the edge of the planet. This circle collision method is only applied between a sprite and the planet, and since rectangles don’t rotate then all sprites had to be perfect squares.

Bullets were one of the only sprites that weren’t built to orbit the planet, instead simply moving in an angle that combines the firing direction with the player’s current angle. I’ve had some feedback that said that the bullets should also be affected by gravity. I decided against it because it would make enemies on the planet easier to hit, while enemies in the sky would be harder to aim, not to mention the game loses a strategy element because of where bullets travel.

 

I went with three base enemy types: Rockets, Spikes and Robots.

Robots functions no differently from the player, except that it moves in a fix direction and smaller ones bounce by constantly jumping. Spikes has the same orbiting system, but it’s planet radius is much smaller to allow it to go into the planet. I use FlxTween and the FlxTimer to allow the spikes to move in sequence. Rockets simply spawn outside the screen at an angle and move towards the centre of the planet. If a rocket touches the planet then it would be destroyed, resulting in an instant game over.

I also added an escape object, which changes the planets side and makes the level a little bit more harder. This was for variety, so you wouldn’t have to stay on the same planet. If I had a bit more time I would have included more animations on the planet itself.

Speaking of the planet, that was one of the first objects I applied polished graphics to. To give it a more detailed pattern, I used the built in Cellular Automata function, and applied the pixels to the circle. Since it uses a random seed, the pattern is different on each playthrough.

The planet’s destruction is a particle effect that uses the planet sprite’s texture, a technique I used a lot in Gemstone Keeper. However one gripe was that I had to make a derived FlxEmitter class that could allow me to set how many frames I wanted based on the particle’s frame size.

Along with proper sprites, smoke was added to the spikes so that the game can provide a one second warning before spikes hit. I also added a distance check to avoid some unfair spike deaths. Finally I added a second camera mode incase the first one wasn’t interesting enough. The follow camera simply rotates with the player so they can stay in one spot while all the other objects rotated around. It did mean having to create a new Camera for UI elements, since objects can only be parallax scrolled by position.

The last elements I added were the title screen and audio. Sound effects were produced with BFXR and music with Abundent-Music’s Procedural Music Generator. Audio is one of my weakest skills so these procedural tools made that quick and simple, although I probably wouldn’t enter myself into the audio category for them.

I figured I add a smaller version of the planet in the title screen and have the player sprite on a bigger world to give a vague sense of a setting, with emphasis that the player is fighting on tiny planets and not just a giant on a regular sized planet.

And that’s basically how I made littleBLASTplanet. If I had more time I probably would have created more enemies and made proper transitions between planets. Aside from that I’m pretty happy with the results, particularly hacking the physics to getting jumping and moving around a 2D planet to be possible.

Voting for the game begins on Wednesday Friday, so if you took part in Ludum Dare, please check it out!

Final Stretch: Gemstone Keeper’s Release

Back in May, I made a simple demo for a University Thesis, now it’s less than two weeks away from being released onto Steam. This is such an exciting occassion for me, but also a nerve wracking one. If all goes to plan, Gemstone Keeper will be available on Steam on March 31st at 6pm GMT.

For the time being I will be working hard on polishing the game and getting the word out, I appreciate any help from that. There have been several updates from when the game was shown at LAGC, especially thanks to the feedback I got of the game from both GEEK Play Expo and GDC. Game has been balanced (repeatedly), boss battles have been redone and several bugs have been fixed.

I’d also like to give my thanks to Gemstone Keeper’s composer for the soundtrack, Vincent Rubinetti. He is probably best known for producing the music to the game INK, the colourful yet minimal platformer by Zack Bell. We’ve been in regular discussions both online and at GDC about the game’s music, and you can hear one of the tracks from the game’s brand new trailer above, I think it’s some brilliant work.

I’d like to thank everyone who has shown support for Gemstone Keeper over the last year or more, this game has been a huge milestone to conquer and I hope all those who try it will have a great experience.

It’s just amazing to think of how it all started…

Ludum Dare and Steam Greenlight

This last week of April is going to be a busy week, and May will be even busier, so I’d figure it’s best to write this out now. Last week I took part in Ludum Dare 35, with 48 hours on a surprisingly rare free-weekend (my weekends are usually filled by going out and hanging out with people or going to events, such is life). The theme was shapeshift, so obviously a lot of games involve changing shapes with a few that either use shapeshifting in either the levels, the monsters or even in the mechanics.

While the theme voting was going on, one of the suggested themes was “Two Colours”, and so all my ideas were pretty much blurred out by one of my favourite games of all time: Ikaruga. So I decided to combine shapeshifting ships with colour shifting bullet absorbing, this is where Spinstar comes from.

 

This was quite fun to make, particularly with the animation and the bullet patterns, you can go vote on the game here or play the game directly on itch.io here. I’ll be voting on games still, hopefully I’ll get a good score like my past entries.

On other pressing matters, I plan to take Gemstone Keeper to Steam Greenlight. I have already been working on the Steam page itself, but I’m giving myself three weeks to fine-tune the page, get the trailer finished and let as many people know about it as possible.

Steam Greenlight Anouncement

I’ve been working on the trailer, I’ve had difficulties getting game footage until recently, I might write about it once the Steam Greenlight page goes online but it all comes down to trying to find a method that outputs videos with the least washed out colours and as little blurring as possible.

I’ll also keep progress of the game where I can, I’ve been working on bosses and I want to get started on items.

 

Secret of Escape Now Free

To celebrate my birthday, I’ve decided that from this day forth, my stealth game Secret of Escape will now be available to download FREE of charge. You can now get the game from either IndieGameStand or Itch.io if you want to download it and enjoy it as much as you want. I haven’t been able to change the price on Desura because it won’t let me set a price below $1.99, but since Desura’s bankruptcy I doubt anyone will use it.

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