New Years Resolutions

Good evening everyone! It’s no doubt that 2017 has been a hell of a year following what happened in 2016, but we fought through and we are still here fighting! This year has also been huge in terms of game development for me. I managed to finish SEVEN games this year, six from game jams such as #RemakeJam, PROCJam, Jamchester and Three Ludum Dares!

https://img.itch.zone/aW1hZ2UvMTYzMjc3Lzc1MjE2Ni5naWY=/315x250%23c/L0i8g2.gif  https://img.itch.zone/aW1hZ2UvMjAxMDM1LzkzOTE3OC5naWY=/315x250%23c/q5QpUK.gif

The seventh game was the nearly two year project Gemstone Keeper, which made an initial release on March 31st earlier this year and has since had numerous updates, although grouped together as four updates. The most recent of which was 1.0.4 that was announced on 21st of December. The game is currently on part of the Steam Winter Sale, and is currently 50% off!

Gemstone Keeper also had a second smaller release as it was ported to Linux, the build being available on Steam in June. I documented the progress to port the game in three blog posts (part 1, part 2 and part 3), and got a small amount of coverage from dedicated linux gaming websites as a result.

There was also an accomplishment in travel as well, 2017 was the year I went to both GDC in San Francisco and Develop in Brighton for the first time! Both events were great opportunities to meet up and socialise with fellow game developers and listen to talks from great minds such as Ken Perlin, John and Brenda Romero, Jordan Mechnar and Tim Sweeny.

As for 2018, I want to set some goals. As with many New Years Resolutions, chances are they will be forgotten and unaccomplished, but considering I managed to lose weight this year, I might pull through with a bit of committment.

First one is that I want to take part in at least one game jam a month, meaning I’d be finishing 12 games next year. I like the challenge and creativity from game jams, but this year I feel like six isn’t enough. At least spacing out the game jams to one a month will give me time to find a weekend or so to get my head down and finish something.

Second one is to get a game on console. It’s not like I haven’t bothered trying before (I’ve reached out to Nintendo about developing Gemstone Keeper for the Switch to no avail), but it would be nice to expand my work beyond desktop PCs and web development. Porting my own game to Linux should show how when I put my mind to it, building a game to another platform by hand is possible, and it would be great to show I can do that on one of the three main systems.

Thanks for reading and have a happy new year everyone!

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The More You Have, the Worse It Gets

Ludum Dare 40 took place last weekend, the theme was the title above. Honestly it wasn’t the theme I was hoping for, but in the end, I took an idea I had and adjusted it slightly to work.

The idea I had was that a single level would slowly get corrupted and change, you can shoot away the corruption, but touching the corruption would kill you. This already could fit the theme quite well, the more corruption in the world means the worse it is for you. I wanted players to move around a lot, so I had the additional goal of collecting glitch boxes, which would create more corruption over time.

I used HaxeFlixel to develop the game, as it was bread-and-butter for me in game jams such as Ludum Dare, especially when there is not much time to work on an idea (I had spent the entire Saturday out with friends for winter festivities, all I did was write notes on what the idea would be, so in all I only had around 11 hours to work on a game).

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To get the corruption to update and move around, I used the tilemap system and updated the grid with Conway’s Game of Life algorithm, that way it gave the impression of mutating outwards or dying out depending on the numbers. Fortunately, with recent updates to HaxeFlixel, you could do collision response based on specific tiles, so it was easily possible to remove tiles and change the map when bullets collided with it. The extra artefacts also use Conway’s Game of Life. although the grid is 4 times larger than the main corruption grid.

The artwork was done in Photoshop, although it was a very simple and rushed job. The “corrupt” graphics was a multicoloured character set that I had to create and tweak by hand to fit into a 10×10 pixel grid.

The music was a combination of cgMusic and LMMS, quite a good combo to have because it meant I let one program generate a music set, then import it into LMMS as a midi file for me to set instruments (using soundfonts), effects and tweak the melodies how I like.

I managed to upload the game with around 30 minutes left before the compo deadline!

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On Tuesday I fixed that timer, which appeared broken when you reached a minute because I messed up how the string was being built. It took a few uploads for those changes to appear, something that kind of frustrates me about HTML5 and how web browsers will not always clear out the cache if the content has been changed.

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Feel free to play the game on itch.io as well as rate or comment on the Ludum Dare page.


This wasn’t the only games jam I did this winter, I also took part in PROCJAM, where I built a planet generator. It’s not my best work to be honest, although I was able to work and improve my 3D OpenGL rendering in the Vigilante Framework.