All the jams!

I was meaning to post this sooner, but along with work piling up and losing track, I did quite a few game jams. Three in particular: RemakeJam, Jamchester and Ludum Dare.

  

I’ll mention Running The Marathon first, because I only finished the game two days ago from posting. This was made for Ludum Dare 39, which makes it the 10th Ludum Dare I participated (and 9th I submitted a game independently). This was a bit of a last minute entry because until Saturday evening, I had no intention of making something for LD. What changed my mind was a game idea I was coming up with as a joke, running a marathon and making sure you don’t run out of energy. What I ended up with was a bit of a joke on the Track & Field concept, by having rapid button presses make your chances at success worse. Because of how little time I worked on this, the background animations and sounds are lacking, although I do think the running animation on the player turned out okay.

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As is the tradition of Ludum Dare, voting will be going on by all participants for a total of three weeks. Any Ludum Dare entrants can go to the game’s Ludum Dare event page to vote and comment.

Next I’ll talk about Dash Dodge, which was developed for Jamchester 2017, a professional games jam that I took part in last year. This year, I was in a team which consisted of another programmer & sound designer (Jessica Winters) and two artists ( and ). All in all, this was a great team to work with, and we had a heavily planned out game about combatting bosses using only dashing, with a time travel element, although we may have over-anticipated our goals a bit. Needless to say, we made a game with a nice visual style and some neat mechanics thrown around. Hopefully at some point in the future I would like to work with these three again at some point.

Finally, there is 8-Bit Theater: Black Mage is in a Shooting Game. This game, developed for RemakeJam, is a remake of a previous game of mine. In particular, this is a remake of the first game I ever made from back in 2010. What was great about working on this is that I still have the original source project and most of the original assets and notes, although I did have to dig through Google for a copy of GameMaker 8.1 in order to view the original project. Sadly because of lack of time (I rarely allow full days of focus for these game jams, I’ve noticed), I just about managed to remake the original two levels and boss. This wasn’t for naught though, as way back when it took me over a year to reach this far, and this time I managed to achieve the same amount in less than a week. I also took advantage of my own game framework to try out some technical challenges, such as parallax scrolling.

Game Jams are fun, I like taking part in them for those short bursts of game ideas and development challenges. Sadly participating is made more difficult when my day-job takes priority, but when I get a chance to take part I’d like to take full reigns!

Now time for some voting and other challenges!

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Gemstone Keeper – Quest to Linux Part 3 – Gemstone Keeper

Finally, after beginning soon after the game’s Windows release on Steam, and well over a month after I initially wrote my first post about this topic, I’m finally done with porting Gemstone Keeper to Linux (for the most part) and ready to write about what I’ve learned from porting it over. Since both the Framework and Level Generator have been ported, getting the whole game to compile and run wasn’t as confusing as the last two, but that didn’t stop it being tedious.

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Gemstone Keeper – Quest to Linux Part 2 – GenLevelTools

Last time on Quest to Linux, I went through porting the Vigilante Game Framework to Linux, but the quest isn’t over yet. The next big task is porting Gemstone Keeper’s level generator and editor, the GenLevelTools, since I need to be able to get the caverns from somewhere.

https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/a/af/Tux.png

GenLevelTools, aka the Procedural Level Editor, is a tool/library set that enables proceudrally generated grid-based levels to be modified and previewed in a level and used in games, while independent from any specific game engine or renderer. It was originally developed for my University Thesis on Procedural Level Generation and I later did a talk about it at the International Roguelike Developer Conference in Nottingham. The library is written in C++, so language specific quirks like forward slashes and for loops apply, so the main challenge this time around is the level editor, which uses Allegro 5 as well as the GUI library GWEN.

Allegro 5 is a C framework, although you can still use it for C++. Fortunately like SFML, it’s easy to set up for Linux since it’s part of one of Ubuntu’s repositiories. GWEN is a GUI library that was developed by Garry Newman (of Garry’s Mod). It was the easiest to set up for Windows but I had a few problems with the Linux version, as the gmake scripts rely on finding certain libraries and ending the entire scripts if those libraries cannot be found. This is different from running the scripts for Windows, which create Visual Studio projects that you can apply the libraries yourself. After tweaking the scripts and the source files a bit, I managed to get the GWEN and GWEN Allegro Renderer to build.

Aside from the main changes that I mentioned in the last post (using correct slashes, for loops) there weren’t that many changes I needed to make. I did have to add a lot more include statements, since despite being standard library stuff, GCC doesn’t immediately know what functions like memset, modf, floorf or ceilf among others off the bat, unlike Microsoft Visual Studio. After all these changes the library was able to compile smoothly. To make absolutely sure that it works within Linux, I wanted to build and run the editor, hence why I wanted to set up Allegro and GWEN. I managed to compile it with little effort, but something went wrong…

The editor crashed almost immediately, and the only reason I was able to show the following above was because I tried running the editor without the GWEN GUI rendering in the scene. It didn’t help that Code::Blocks debugger wasn’t working initially, and the closest I got as an error was below.

Fortunately I was able to configure Code::Blocks debugger to work, and was able to find the route cause of the crash being from the GWEN Allegro Renderer being unable to load the font, which is odd because the font I used (Lucida Sans) was able to load fine in my editor code, but fortunately GWEN provides an open source font (Open Sans) that runs just fine. So now with the GUI render up and running, I can test the editor!

I’ve been able to compile the library as both a binary and static build, as well as the editor. I could also compile the unit testing and C# wrapper for it too, but since I mainly wanted to get this done for Gemstone Keeper, I’ll leave it like this for now. Time for the main course!

Gemstone Keeper – Quest to Linux Part 1 – Vigilante Framework

So with Gemstone Keeper on Steam for Windows only, I thought I’d try my hand at getting a game to build to Linux the proper way. This series of posts will hopefully document each part of porting Gemstone Keeper to run on Linux.

https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/a/af/Tux.png

The last time I made a game with Linux support was Secret of Escape, which used the Node-webkit to run HTML5 games to desktop applications. Node-Webkit essentially was a separate, precompiled application that functioned like a limited web-browser using the Chromium engine, all Construct2 did was build a HTML5 game and structured it in a file structure that made the application run the game. This way, porting the game to Windows, Mac and Linux took very little effort. This essentially means that developing for Linux was a completely new thing for me before releasing Gemstone Keeper.

The first stage was porting the Vigilante Game Framework. This is the underlaying C++ framework that uses SFML to develop games with state management, collision, visual effects and audio effects among others. It was partially inspired by HaxeFlixel, although with some of my own approaches that rely on C++ and SFML, as well as my own features (such as circle collision, multipass post process effects and a custom text renderer). Getting this to work on Linux would help me with setting up SFML and having a good idea of how Linux development worked.

Surprisingly, getting the framework to build on Linux ended up being the easiest part, because someone else already did it! I posted the framework to GitHub, and passed around the GitHub page to Twitter and Reddit, and SirFrankalot on the /r/gamedev subreddit was able to fork it and get it to work in Linux, and provided both written notes and a pull request to carry his changes over! The details can be found here, but these are the main points I wanted to get across:

  • Using Correct Slashes: When using Windows Explorer and Visual Studio, folders or directories will usually be represented with a backwards slash (\). If you are only developing on Windows, this wouldn’t be a problem. However Linux and Mac both always use a forward slash (/), so for portability you should use that. Using forward slashes also has the advantage of not having to deal with escape sequences, since programming languages use a backwards slash (such as \n, \t and \\).
  • For-Loops: These kinds of loops are good for looping a specific number of times using a defined iterator. If that iterator is a list of object or variables, you use a foreach loop, assuming your programming language of choice has that. When using Visual Studio, I found there is a foreach loop in the form of for each (type x in y) where x is a reference to an object in the list, and y is a container like an array or vector. Turns out this way is purely a Visual Studio extension, and the portable foreach loop is for (type x : y).
  • XInput: Microsoft XInput is the API used for Xbox 360 and Xbox One controller, which means that it’s works for Windows only, at least that’s what you would assume. Linux has both libudev and linux/joystick.h, which allows some Linux OSes to access XInput functionality. This would mean a complete rewrite, so SirFrankalot simply made all XInputDevice functions return false. I later found someone wrote a Gamepad API was maintained long enough to allow Xinput Controllers to work on Windows and Linux using the same functions. I’ve since added this on as an optional feature that can be set using a preprocessor.

https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/3/3f/Logo_Linux_Mint.png

Next was using an IDE, I decided to use Code::Blocks because I have used it before, although it’s still much of a change of Visual Studio. Not to mention I was using a virtual machine, a VirtualBox with Linux Mint 18.1, and for whatever reason my configuration causes it to crash with no warnings. I also had to set up a load of dependancies, although using the terminal to get them is much easier than browsing for libraries online.

 

In the end I managed to build the SFML tutorial code and a few moments later, VFrame could compile! Aside from some small issues with 3D graphics, it was running almost just like it did on Windows!

Next time, it’ll be my ramblings as I port over the library that makes Gemstone Keeper’s caverns large and random, the GenLevelTools!

Final Stretch: Gemstone Keeper’s Release

Back in May, I made a simple demo for a University Thesis, now it’s less than two weeks away from being released onto Steam. This is such an exciting occassion for me, but also a nerve wracking one. If all goes to plan, Gemstone Keeper will be available on Steam on March 31st at 6pm GMT.

For the time being I will be working hard on polishing the game and getting the word out, I appreciate any help from that. There have been several updates from when the game was shown at LAGC, especially thanks to the feedback I got of the game from both GEEK Play Expo and GDC. Game has been balanced (repeatedly), boss battles have been redone and several bugs have been fixed.

I’d also like to give my thanks to Gemstone Keeper’s composer for the soundtrack, Vincent Rubinetti. He is probably best known for producing the music to the game INK, the colourful yet minimal platformer by Zack Bell. We’ve been in regular discussions both online and at GDC about the game’s music, and you can hear one of the tracks from the game’s brand new trailer above, I think it’s some brilliant work.

I’d like to thank everyone who has shown support for Gemstone Keeper over the last year or more, this game has been a huge milestone to conquer and I hope all those who try it will have a great experience.

It’s just amazing to think of how it all started…

Gemstone Keeper at LAGC 2017

So I had a great time at the London Anime and Gaming Convention, even despite some unfortunate setbacks. Indie Zone Administrator and developer at Grandpa Pixel (Folks behind the RPG Legenda series) was unable to make it at the last minute. What made it all the more unfortunate was that there were only three indies at the Indie Zone this year: myself, Crystalline Green (developer of Flight of Light and Atlantis Dare) and Hei Stories (Indie Animation Studio working on Seeking Scarlet At The End Of The World). Needless to say we brought attention to the many attendees who were walking around the gaming area, looking for something to play outside of the retro games in store.

  

I also did a short talk on game development in general, talking about my game development process and answering questions on topics such as piracy, game engines, looking for feedback and much more. Despite the small numbers, demoing the game did help find a few bugs and it was great hearing people say they love the visuals and the challenging gameplay. There was one kid who went back to the game multiple times, which was unexpected.

In a weeks time on Saturday the 18th to the following Sunday I’ll be at GEEK Expo in Margate. Unfortunately unless some other plans come up this will be the last event I’ll be exhibiting Gemstone Keeper before release, as I was unsuccessful with my application at the Leftfield Collection at Rezzed. I will be sure to attend Rezzed as well as GDC in San Francisco so there might be a chance to see me around. Till then I’ll be making my usual posts on social media.

Where to play Gemstone Keeper?

On March 31st, Gemstone Keeper will be available on Steam. However before then there will be a few opportunities to play Gemstone Keeper at some game events, at least in the UK. These events are beneficial for getting feedback, so the game’s quality will improve before release. Here are two gaming events which are currently confirmed places to try out the beta version of Gemstone Keeper.

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Feb 7th and 8th – The Rocket Complex London Metropolitan University

LAGC is a bi-annual anime and gaming convention run by AnimeLeague, and specifically I’ll be in the Gaming Area where the Indie Zone is. I have attended the convention several times in the past, and have enjoyed the many events and stalls available.

Feb 18th and 19th – Marine Studios

GEEK is a gaming and comic book (among other things) festival, featuring retro and modern games, as well as pinball and of course, indie games. Gemstone Keeper will be present at GEEK’s Indie Zone. This will be the first time I have attended an event in Kent, so I’m looking forward to what this event has in store.

Now while I won’t be exhibiting, I will also be reaching outside the UK as I go to GDC in San Francisco, (Feb 27th – March 3rd). While I won’t be showing off Gemstone Keeper on the show floor, I’m hoping to meet several other indie developers and attend meetups around the conference, so there may be a few opportunities for Gemstone Keeper to be played during the week in the USA.

While it hasn’t been confirmed yet, I am hoping to once again, attend Insomnia Gaming Festival in April. I last attended Insomnia’s Indie Zone at i58 and had a great time there, so it would be great to present Gemstone Keeper there once again.

Finally, I can now confirm that Gemstone Keeper now has it’s own official website. This will be a central place to describe what the game is about and to see the latest screenshots and videos, such as these ones below.

Gemstone Keeper Underground

Gemstone Keeper Ice

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Gemstone Keeper Fire